PREVALENCE AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH COMPASSION FATIGUE AMONG NURSES IN THE PHILIPPINE HEART CENTER (2017)

Authors: Marylou Andrea G. Candano and Mary Rose Ann M. Mancuyas (Philippine Heart Center)

 

 

BACKGROUND:

One of the core values of Philippine Heart Center is compassion. It entails healing and nurturing response to the suffering of others.  More often than not, nurses are not aware of the consequence of negative things they absorb when interacting with patients and their family that eventually leads to compassion fatigue.  Extreme stressors include burnout and secondary traumatic stress that affect efficient patient care.

 

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the level and factors associated with compassion fatigue such as burnout and secondary stress among nurses at the Philippine Heart Center.

 

METHODS:

The study utilized a cross-sectional analytic design.  Level of compassion was correlated with the nurses’ age, gender, length of direct patient care, unit assignment, stress level, job fulfillment and compassion satisfaction.  Survey was conducted in all nursing units of the Philippine Heart Center.  Sample population (n=262) was determined through total enumeration.  Workplace stress level of staffs was measured through self-administered tool with 10-item questionnaire that was pretested with a Cronbach’s alpha result of 0.97.  Professional Quality of Life Scale Version 5 (PROQOL5) was utilized to determine the levels of compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary traumatic stress. 

 

RESULTS:

Findings revealed that higher level of work stress results to higher chance of secondary traumatic stress among nurses at the Philippine Heart Center. While male nurses appeared more vulnerable than female nurses, higher autonomy, professional development, empowerment, work environment and fundamentals of quality nursing care all relate to burnout.