INTENSIVE CARE NURSES’ KNOWLEDGE OF, ADHERENCE AND BARRIERS TO EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES FOR PREVENTION OF VENTILATOR-ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA (2017)

Franchesca Olivia Napalit, RN, MSN

 (Jose B. Lingad Memorial Regional Hospital)

 

 

BACKGROUND:

Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is considered as the most common nosocomial infection (Vincent, 2004) that frequently occurs in the intensive care unit (ICU) (Amin, 2009). VAP is usually associated with increased mortality, morbidity (Davis, 2006), prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation and ICU stay. Therefore, VAP is considered as an important determinant of outcome for critically ill patients (Melsen, et al., 2009) and nurses play a vital role in reducing the risks of VAP.

 

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to describe and examine the relationships of the ICU nurses’ profile and their knowledge, adherence, and the barriers towards practicing evidence-based guidelines for VAP prevention.

 

METHODS:

Two multiple-choice instruments were adapted from the studies of Labeau et al., 2007, Jansson et al., 2013, and Ricart et al., 2003. Data was collected from 12 tertiary hospitals in Pampanga (n=145) through purposive sampling of ICU nurses, with a response rate of 94.77%. Pearson’s r and Point Biserial Correlations were used to determine the relationships of the variables in this study.

 

RESULTS:

Results revealed that half of the respondents (50.34%) have acceptable scores (mean of >5) in the knowledge test. The overall self-reported adherence was 87.48%. The main self-reported barriers towards evidence-based guidelines were: “inadequate resources and disagreement with the results”, “the need for doctor’s orders” and “if guidelines are necessary”. A significant relationship with adherence was also found on the ICU nurses’ age and length of clinical practice. Additionally, knowledge has shown statistical relationships with adherence and working hours.